Experiences, anecdotes, tips, how-tos, hiking, nature, motherhood, memories.

Adventures in Camping with Kids

Camping with kids is like pitching a tent upside down. Both are bound to fill with laughter and raindrops.

--Victoria Marie

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Storing Camping Equipment for the Season

 
http://campingwithfivekids.blogspot.com
We wrap the bed mattresses and dinette
cushions in old clean sheets and store
them flat, separate from the trailer.
          Happy New Year, Camping with Kids blog followers!  We wish you all health and safe adventures in 2017.  To that end, you might wish to check your camping equipment to be sure it’s properly stored for the season.

You want to store your camping unit after it has been thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. Store any loose camping equipment separate from the camper, washed and indoors in a dry place.  This includes any mattresses or loose couch or dinette cushions the unit may have.
            If at all possible, it is best to store a camper or trailer indoors, like a garage.  You need a place where it is dry and protected from weather.  Snow and ice, freeze and thaw wreaks havoc on sealants and connectors and gaskets.  Even the sun can affect a camper. Sealants can dry and crack in continued sunlight.  This is what happened to the center seam in our Jayco Eagle trailer.

If storage inside is not possible, cover the camper or trailer with a unit-specific-sized UV resistant cover or a breathable flat tarp You are looking to keep moisture out of your camper. A breathable tarp is woven and doesn’t allow moisture to gather.  Mold can become a health risk in a camper.  Some tarps are UV resistant now. Strap the cover or tarp down tightly.  Winter weather can be blustery. You are trying to keep wet leaves, bird droppings, snow and ice off the trailer and hopefully bugs and small animals from making nests in your unit.

            Disconnect propane tanks and store them separately from the trailer, if you can, to protect the gaskets. If you can’t take them off, cover them well. There are soft and hard covers available for purchase.

            Take the weight off the tires of the camper by securely placing jack stands or legs or whatever lifting device you have under the trailer. Place cinderblocks or bricks under the lifting device if your unit is on soft ground. While you may want to place a smaller trailer on its legs, a larger unit may stabilize better on heavy-duty jack stands.  The main thing is to cover tires so the sun won’t dry rot them.

            These are all suggestions we do; however, you can find more details about winter storage of trailers here

            Here’s something that often gets forgotten. Make a list of things that you’ll need to replace or fix for the next season. Lists. I live by lists. Find some of my ideas for lists and schedules here.   When the kids melt things over the campfire, I add the item to my “replace list.”  When a plastic plate cracks, I add it to the replace list. A leaky potty or stove problem? On the fix or replace list. Kids too big for their sleeping bags? Replace list. Not enough forks? I think you get the idea.

Many times when families finish camping for the season, they congratulate themselves for surviving another season of camping with the family and don’t want to think about camping until next year. I understand this. We’re guilty of it too—especially when the children were little. But the better you store and care for your camping equipment, the more camping adventures you will share with your family, and the more memories you will have to treasure for a lifetime.

Do you have any tips on storing camping equipment? Any camping adventures you’d like to share?  Feel free to leave a note. It’s always appreciated.