Experiences, anecdotes, tips, how-tos, hiking, nature, motherhood, memories.

Adventures in Camping with Kids

Camping with kids is like pitching a tent upside down. Both are bound to fill with laughter and raindrops.
--Victoria Marie

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Temporary Insanity: Jumping off Cliffs in the Adirondack Mountains

Feet first when jumping from a height.
West Virginia wasn’t the only state that the Lees crew jumped off cliffs into a swirling river.  On another camping trip, there was no guided river run adventure.  I had no raft to hurry and catch up to, no lunch to miss with the group of fellow rafters, and no bus to find in order to ride back to our van with the family. 

I had only my paralyzing fears of falling and rocks hiding in dark waters.

We had planned an exciting camping trip hiking and climbing up switchbacks in the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York, beautiful mountains with rugged terrain and stiff terra firma.  Our hiking boots were stowed in the camper.  I had no visions of screaming and flying off craggy outcroppings of mountains into rushing water.

Until my teenaged son went fishing one morning in the Ausable, a tannin-colored river. 
It was relatively close to our campsite. This was a catch and release section of the river.  At breakfast he shared some interesting news. 

“Hey, Mom,” he began.  “There’s this neat place you can jump into the Ausable from.” His chocolate brown eyes fairly danced with excitement.

“How do you know,” his sisters asked in unison.

“Wait!”  I tried to get back to the jump word.

“Is it close by?”  His father asked.

“The kid I was fishing with told me you can park right after the bridge on Route 9 and follow the path.”

“Is it safe?”  I finally got a word in.
“Mom,” my son looked into my frightened eyes.  “Everyone who lives around here does it.”

“That doesn’t necessarily make it safe,” I tried to explain.

“They’re teenagers now,” my husband reminded me as we drove to the parking place.

“And I’d like to give them an opportunity to attend college.”  Sometimes I think I’m the only sane person in this family.

As we walked down the path, I heard screams, laughter, and rushing water.  We came upon a craggy precipice where people were indeed jumping off into the deep brown waters of the Ausable River.

I shook so much; I needed to sit down before I fell off the cliff.  The top of the cliff was 30 feet above the water, but I noticed people jumping from narrow ledges below that height.  This jump off point was a short distance downstream from waterfalls on the opposite bank of the river.  The bridge we drove across to get to the parking area was on the upper side of the falls where huge boulders pinched the thundering Ausable into a narrow channel. 

            Watching others jump off cliffs still doesn’t make it easy for a mother to allow her children to jump.  I watched the people jump for a while as my family pestered me.  The people were jumping away from the ledge to hit the water about 10 feet from the river bank.  The lower level jumpers looked up to the precipice and waved their hand, “I’m jumping,” and the top person backed away from the ledge. 

“Let Dad go first,” I finally said, “on the lower ledge.”

My husband climbed down the side of the cliff to the lower level and leapt.  He came up cheering, and the children scurried down to the lower level to jump—the first time.  They all quickly moved up to the 30 foot precipice.   

            Only once did I venture up there, with the insane, to that dizzying height.  Staring into the rushing waters of the Ausable, I tried to convince myself that I was only temporarily insane, and that as soon as I took the plunge, I would swim over to the big boulder and continue the recitation of my rosary. 

You never dive into dark waters.  Even after you check out the riverbed.  Everyone jumping that day went in feet first.  It’s also a good idea for ladies to wear t-shirts over their bathing suits.  Take note that hitting water from the height of 20 or 30 feet repeatedly bruises the body at the point of impact.  Our feet were a bit tender on the drive home.

            We all survived the big plunge.  But then the children wanted to come back the next day after hiking and the next.  Luckily we headed for home on the fourth day.  I didn’t think I could have convinced myself one more day that I was only temporarily insane.  Ahh…the thrills of camping with the family.    


Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Wet and Wild: Riding the New River Part 3

We survived the wild waters of the
               New River in West Virginia 
“Who wants to ride on the bull-nose,” Seth asked my excited but tired children during the calm before the last rapid series on our New River whitewater rafting trip in West Virginia.


            I think the children only heard, “Who wants to ride…” before all five hands shot up.  One of the twins—our youngest—was quickest. 


            “Okay,” Seth said as I started to tremble.  “Now position yourself on the bull-nose of the raft [the front nose of the raft], legs out, facing the rapids.  Hold the rope with one hand, one arm up, and shout ‘Yahoo!’ as the raft plunges into the rapid.”


            I started screaming.  “Are you crazy, Seth?” 


He just smiled and shrugged.


“I’ve spent the whole trip trying to keep the children in the raft during rapids and you want one of them to ride the raft like a bull?”

“She’s wearing a life jacket.”


“As she falls into the hydraulics of the rapids and rocks and the raft covers her!”


My husband said I was becoming hysterical—again.  “Seth wouldn’t have suggested it if it wasn’t safe.”


“Safe for whom?!”  I screeched.



The twin did ride the nose over the rapid, but I noticed her squeak her rump back into the raft as opposed to sitting on the lip.  As soon as the raft nosed into the hydraulic, she slipped herself into the raft bottom, arm still up, still shouting “Yahoo!” as instructed.


We all thought she was brave, but I still glared at Seth who just smiled at me.


Remember that the guides do know the river and what is safe to do at the time and conditions of the river, but you are the parents.  You are always in control of what your family participates in and what you’d rather just ride through. 


Another thing we learned on this river trip was to wear synthetic fabrics. They don’t hold the water like cotton does.  Therefore you feel dryer and stay warmer especially if you raft in the springtime.  Shoes are very important; sneakers are best as they are stronger than water shoes and tie on your feet.  You always need to consider that you will tumble out of the raft and have to negotiate the rocks and boulders as you bob downstream feet first [always feet first!].  Life jackets are life savers when whitewater rafting.  Believe it.


Whitewater rafting is exhilarating, surprising, and strenuous.  But oh so fun!  There are age limitations that must be met for children to accompany the journey.  Have you ever faced the whitewater on a raft? 

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Wet and Wild: Riding the New River Part 2


Whitewater rapids here we come!
“Who wants to jump off a cliff into the New River?” Seth asked our whitewater rafting family crew as we came around the next bend in the river in West Virginia.


            “Cliff?!”  I turned to my husband behind me in the raft.  “Did he say ‘to jump off a cliff’”?  I screeched.


            “It’s a huge boulder, really,” Seth assured me as the pale pink sandstone cliff came into view and we saw our other rafts pull over to the bank.

            As I gazed up from the water, I told my husband, “It looks like a cliff to me.” 


Some mothers have problems when you combine certain words, like “jumping off a cliff” when it comes to her children.  Yet my children scampered up the huge boulder with the rest of the rafters. 

Once we all left the rafts, the guides pulled the rafts back into the swift moving New River and floated downstream. 


“Wait!”  I shouted after Seth. 

“Just jump off the boulder and swim to the raft!”  He shouted back to me. 

I was the only one left on the beach.  Everyone else was on top of the boulder jumping into the current of the river and swimming toward their rafts.


“C’mon, Vic,” my husband called down.


Grudgingly, I climbed up the boulder and lay flat to peer over the lip at the tannin-colored water 30 feet below.


“Hurry, Mom,” my children called from the safety of the raft.


No one was paddling, yet the raft was gaining distance from the boulder.  I had to jump or forfeit the picnic lunch which was next on the agenda.  After a morning of digging the paddle into a cauldron of whitewater, I was starving.  With my heart pounding in my head, probably because of the tight vest, I decided to bless myself and depend on that vest to keep me from drowning.  The shriek that escaped from my lips as I jumped from the boulder frightened the birds from the trees. 


Once in the water, I struggled to catch up to our raft and found I couldn’t pull myself over the huge tube.  With the assistance of Seth, I flopped into the bottom of the raft like a drowned pelican.


“When’s lunch,” I gasped to Seth.


“Right after the Double Z,” he said with a smile.

As I struggled to my position on the tube edge and tucked my sneakers under it, I thought again how odd to actually name rapids. 


Lunch was a welcomed break to the day, and for the first time, my children ate everything included in the “boxed” lunch provided by Appalachian Whitewater Outfitters. 


As we plied our paddles that afternoon at the command of Seth, through many classifications of rapids from ripples to hydraulics, classes I to V, we came up to the rapids the guides called “the bloody nose hole,” an undercut at Millers Folly Rapids. 


We were almost finished with our exhilarating ride on the New River, and my children had remained in the raft during deep hydraulics and high level rapids on the river because of my continued shouting to shove their sneakered feet under the huge tube.  Just when I thought I could stop hyperventilating, Seth had one more question to ask my children. 

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Wet and Wild: Riding the New River Part 1


Rafting the New River in West Virginia
Now let’s get back to some camping adventures.  The thrill of whitewater rafting.  Ever try it?
 

            If you’re an experienced paddler, late spring is a great time to go whitewater rafting as the spring thaw in the mountains feeds the streams with thundering whitewater.  Children need to be at least 14 years of age to raft in spring.    


Although my husband and I rafted before and we took the children on smaller rafting trips, everyone wanted to try rafting the big water.  So our summer camp trip revolved around rafting the New River in West Virginia.  We camped in the New River Gorge area and took a full day guided river trip with the Appalachian Wildwater outfitters on the Lower New River.  In the summer, the water isn’t as high and children can raft at 12, our youngest the twins’ age.  


            Rafters are required to wear helmets and life vests to take on the New River.  And the rafting guides came along to check and tighten these vests once we put them on. 


            I didn’t know that as my husband and I checked our children’s vests to be sure they were properly closed.  Then a lady came by and yanked on everyone’s vest straps.  My eyes started bulging as did the children’s.


            “Is breathing important?”  I squeaked to the woman.

            “Not nearly as much as being able to find the body in the river,” she quipped.

            I rushed over to my husband.  “I’ve changed my mind.”

            “You’re getting hysterical,” he whispered as our guide Seth demonstrated the paddle commands and moves.

            “It’s because the blood’s cut off to my brain,” I croaked.

            I glanced at the children.  Seth’s authoritative voice held their attention as they copied his motions.  If they can function in tight vests, so can I.      
 

All seven of us went on one 14 foot raft—plus our guide, who sat at the back of the raft.  We put in at Thurmond and planned to come out right before the New River Gorge Bridge. 
 

After the first rapid—Surprise, yes the rapids are named—the adrenaline started pumping.  Roller coaster waves!  Water in your face waves!  Hold on to your tube—and paddle—waves!  I kept shouting to the children to tuck their sneakers under the huge outer tube they sat on to paddle.
 

Seth was correct.  Did we ever doubt him?  We had calm periods on the water between the rapid series. 

 
            But then Seth shattered my calm, deep-breathing float in the raft after a few rapid series. 

Thursday, February 20, 2014

How to Plan a Camping Trip Part 2

One of our campsites
When planning any road trip, it’s important to remember driving distances and travel times.  Time zones or ferry schedules need to be considered in addition to the amount of driving time per day if you have a long haul to make.  Rest stops are crucial for tired drivers as well as children who need to use the restroom.  Don’t forget to enjoy an unhurried picnic lunch.  It’s a vacation, and vacations need to be somewhat restful for all involved. 
 

Once you have a vacation plan and have settled on some dates for the trip, begin reserving your campground site(s).  This is important, especially if you plan to camp in popular vacation areas.  They fill up quickly. 
 

If you are camping in several places during your vacation, remember to consider the time needed to break camp and travel to your next campground.  Everything takes longer in the field.  Inform the campground if you will be getting in late, so they hold your campsite for you.
 

What you bring with you on your camping trip depends on where you stay and what you camp in.  Primitive or commercial campgrounds.  Tent, trailer, camper, or cabin.  If there is no barbeque grill or fire ring available at the campsite, you’ll need something to cook on.  We use a Coleman camp stove that uses propane.  Propane is available at campground stores.  Wood is available as well at the camp stores for campfires.  Bring cooking pots and utensils.  We refrain from using disposable cups, plates, and plastic ware to help the environment.  Then pack appropriate bedding and towels, in addition to personal items. 
 

            Get everyone involved in packing to build excitement and family experience.  Make check lists for kitchen, bedding, clothing, food, and toiletry.  Don’t forget the bug spray, sun screen, hats, and raincoats.  Load the vehicle and/or camper prior to the day of departure, except for perishables.  Bring any reservation material you have made, a global positioning device [GPS] and maps.  Always bring current maps of the areas you will be driving through or staying in. 


Then enjoy your family camping experience.  Make the memories that last.      

Monday, January 20, 2014

How to Plan a Camping Trip Part 1

Camping at a Primitive site
Start planning your trip before the campgrounds open for the season.  Meet with the family to get everyone’s input.  Determine the type of camping experience your family wants.  Are you trying to get to certain places or spend time at various campgrounds or enjoy the local area?     

 
Remember finances.  A good reason to camp is because it is an economical way to travel. The cost of campgrounds hinge upon the number in your party.  Commercial campgrounds usually have all the amenities; electricity, water, and sewerage hookups, playground, pool, arts and crafts, activities, game room, bath houses, and store.  They cost more than the primitive campsites with no hookups or amenities.
 

National and state park primitive campsites can have ranger stations and some give talks and tours of the nature area.  Some primitive campsites may have flush toilets, but not many.  At commercial campgrounds, hookups are charged by which you use.  Having a pop-up trailer, we never needed a sewerage hookup.     


Your travel vehicle should be in good working order.  A good idea is to go over the basic maintenance of your vehicle before leaving on vacation or have a mechanic look it over.  Oil change, tune-up, fluids check, sensors [oxygen or engine coolant temperature], exhaust system, air conditioning.  New tires aren’t a bad idea if you plan any far distances. 


Also consider everyone’s abilities at this early stage planning your camping trip.  Remember that everything takes longer when camping; set-up, meals, cleanup.  Plan events that everyone is interested in, like hiking, rafting, horseback riding, town festivals, and amusement parks.  Gather details about things to do in the states, parks, or areas that you plan to visit; brochures, websites, and tour books from travel clubs. 


Don’t forget to include the ability to travel for long distances in a car/van when deciding where to go.  We’ll talk about that next.

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Filling the Heart with Memories

Our children at the Pocono House
Although we never camped outside in the wintertime, we would take the family to the Pocono Mountains in Pennsylvania seeking snow.  Usually we’d leave December 27th for a short respite after the Christmas rush.  We rented a small home and needed our camping skills to make it work.  


            Sleeping bags for the children tucked into a loft.  Sharing food preparation and clean-up.  Yes.  It takes longer, but how else can Mom find a break.  Hide and go seek with a flashlight at night.  Star gazing in a crystal clear night sky.  Snow gear and sleds crammed into the van, tobogganing and sledding down the local hill.  Ice skating and sliding on the frozen lake.  Check to see how long temperatures have been below freezing before venturing out on a lake.  Also check for cracks on the ice surface.  


Yes, we hiked in the wintertime, snow covering the mountainside of Hickory Run StatePark, ice coating the tree branches, icicles clinging to waterfalls.  Keeping feet dry is a must when hiking in winter.  Snow/ski pants, thick socks, and waterproof boots are not just for skiing.  When hiking in winter use layers of clothing and wear a hat.  We lose most of our heat through exposed heads.  Gloves are a great idea, too.  


For just a few days, we had no computers or cell phone checking.  It’s a good idea to attempt this kind of break at some time.  A chance to rediscover what it means to actually be a family.  


Merry Christmas to everyone.  May you all have a healthy and happy 2014.